“Illness Cleanses Us” ~ Tracey Derrick


Tracey Derrick: 1 in 9 - breast cancer photography (Advocates For Breast Cancer - South Africa)

Treatment options for breast cancer are dependent upon the type of cancer and the size of the tumour. I was diagnosed with a grade 2, invasive ductal carcinoma, tumour size 30mm. It was suspected and confirmed after surgery, that 3 out of 21 lymph nodes under my arm were infected. These were subsequently removed.

Aside from surgery, the main forms of Western medicine’s attack on cancer are chemotherapy and radiation. The two methods are based on a single principle: generally, cancer cells are extremely fast growing. They divide much more rapidly than any of the body’s normal cells. Therefore if you administer cell-poisoning drugs to the body that kill cells when they divide, then you will kill some normal, healthy cells but many cancer cells. This is what both chemotherapy and radiation do. Chemotherapy is administered intravenously and travels through the bloodstream to every part of the body. The normal cells in the body that grow more rapidly than others, such as hair, stomach lining, mouth tissue, nose, nails, will also be killed more rapidly, hence accounting for hair loss, stomach nausea etc. At the end of a successful course of chemotherapy, the tumour is dead and the patient only half dead.

I chose (how much choice did I have? – I wanted the cancer cut out, eradicated, gone), a mastectomy and six sessions of chemotherapy because the cancer had spread to my lymph nodes and possibly to somewhere else in my body – cancer cells use the lymph nodes for travelling. After chemo I now follow a drug regime to reduce the possibility of the cancer returning.”


TAKEAWAY:

How to Manage Chemotherapy Symptoms Through Food

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Basic banana body builder

basic-banana-body-builderIf your appetite is suppressed, if you need to build up muscle, if you need to put weight on, or if you are worried about insufficient protein.

4ozs (100g) plain tofu (silken tofu makes a smoother drink)

1 pink (500ml, generous 2 cups) soya milk

2 bananas

2 tablespoons organic maple syrup

1 tablespoon slippery elm powder

2 teaspoons vanilla essence

Whizz together in a goblet blender or food processor until smooth and creamy

If you have difficult drinking from a glass, use a teaspoon and eat it from a small bowl like dessert, or add more soya milk to thin it and use a pretty straw.

 

Try any of these additions or flavour variations

2 tablespoons ground almonds

2 tablespoons cooked brown rice/millet/oats

Any fresh fruit – try mangoes for a real treat

Soaked or cooked dried fruits

1 teaspoon honey or concentrated apple juice

1 tablespoon organic, sugar-free preserves

THANKS TO DR ROSY DANIEL, WHO HAS GENEROUSLY SHARED THE CANCER LIFELINE RECIPES WITH US. THIS RECIPE IS FOR THE TOUGH TIMES, FOR USE WHEN YOU ARE VERY ILL, DURING TREATMENT, WHILE THE APPETITE IS POOR AND THE WEIGHT LOW.

 

What is normal?

qLet’s normalise a few things right now:

  • There is no “right way” to make sense of what a cancer diagnosis means in anyone’s life
  • We can’t expect everyone to react in a similar way, or say the same things as anyone else – each person is unique and of course their response to their cancer treatment will be individual as well;
  • It’s very common for people to feel confused, disbelieving or angry when newly diagnosed, but this is not true for everyone;
  • Sometimes our bodies even respond to the stress and shock with physical responses – headaches, nausea, diarrhea, sighing, poor sleep patterns etc; and
  • Often people look forward to the end of treatment, but sometimes folks feel fearful, uncertain, or more emotional than they did during the treatment.

Blog by Clare Manicom, Oncology Social Worker

Introducing… The Breast Health Foundation

The Breast Health Foundation was launched in 2002 to raise awareness of breast health among women through a series of community based education projects and creating awareness via community health facilities.

The projects currently employ six women, themselves breast cancer survivors, who give talks at churches, places of employment and public clinics about breast health, breast self-examination and the importance of early detection.  Fourteen years on and there has been a noticeable increase in the number of women being diagnosed early.

Over the years the organisation has, through expansion, based itself in the Vaal/Sedibeng area, Cape Town and Durban. The women based in those areas facilitate educational talks, counselling and patient navigation. These educators are also at the regional breast care centres to assist the patients that have been referred and provide counseling if diagnosed.

To date our community educators have directly impacted 72 811 women through community education projects and have made 291 clinic visits. In total, 2913 women have been navigated and 376 diagnosed with various stages of breast cancer throughout all our active areas.

Bosom Buddies (BB) was established as a project of the BHF, a support group for survivors and their family and friends. The group aims to provide emotional and informative support to all individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and is run by survivor volunteers. The ‘buddies’ provide support to people affected by breast cancer at point of diagnosis and during treatment. BB hosts public meetings in Johannesburg every seven (7) weeks and speakers are invited to share knowledge and experiences with the buddies.

Buddies for Life, a bi-monthly lifestyle magazine, is published by Word for Word Media on behalf of the Breast Health Foundation. In sustaining the aims of the Breast Health Foundation. All of the persons involved with Buddies for Life are either medical or healthcare professionals, and they have been affected by breast cancer themselves or have been inspired by a breast cancer survivor. Each issue of Buddies contains a section dedicated to the early detection of breast cancer.

The Breast Health Foundations purpose is to:

  • increase the awareness of breast health;
  • promote education and treatment and
  • provide support in respect of breast health.

Our mission is to

  • create breast health awareness in the community,
  • ensure individual access to information,
  • potentiate access to appropriate healthcare resources,
  • create an ongoing audit of operational effectiveness and
  • offer emotional and informative support.

 And through our projects, we have succesfully managed to realise great results.

You can connect with us on a daily through our social media pages:

:

BHF: https://www.facebook.com/BreastHealthFoundation/

BB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/31260668033/?ref=br_tf

Buddies For Life: https://www.facebook.com/BFLMagazine/?fref=ts

EBC:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/903665216386353/

BHF: @BreastBhf

Buddies For Life: @BFLmagazine

This post was written by R.Vanessa Mthombeni for The Breast Health Foundation

 

 

 

Creamed root gratin

Another recipe for the tough times. This is pure comfort food for when you feel like nothing else.

gratin

500g potatoes, peeled and chopped
a generous cup of celeriac, peeled and chopped
1 small parsnip, peeled and diced quite small
1 small chopped onion
1 clarge carrot, peeled and very thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, and the same of black pepper
1 teaspoon low salt stock powder
Soya milk to cover

Bring to the boil and simmer until the vegetables are very soft. Drain and mash or blend to a smooth puree.

Pile into an oiled, overnproof dish, splash with a little olive oil and soy sauce and bake in a hot oven (200 deg C) until golden.

Serve hot, sprinkled with parsley or chives.

Yummy!

THANKS TO DR ROSY DANIEL, WHO HAS GENEROUSLY SHARED THE CANCER LIFELINE RECIPES WITH US. THIS RECIPE IS FOR THE TOUGH TIMES, FOR USE WHEN YOU ARE VERY ILL, DURING TREATMENT, WHILE THE APPETITE IS POOR AND THE WEIGHT LOW.

Targeted biological therapies

Approximately 20% of breast cancers are known as HER2 positive. This means that a gene mutation has caused the cells to have an over expression of HER2 receptors and this protein signals the cancer cells to grow and divide.

The HER2 receptor can be tested for by:

  1. Immunohistochemistry (IHC)- which shows how much of the protein is on the cell surface
  2. In-situ hybridisation (ISH)- which tests the number of copies of the gene inside the cell..

HER2 positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than HER2 negative cancers.

Trastuzamab (Herceptin) is a biological therapy that has been designed to specifically target the HER2 receptor in HER@ positive breast cancer. It reduces the risk of recurrence and death in women with HER2 positive breast cancer and prolongs survival in women with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer.

Lapatinib (Tykerb) is another “HER receptor blocker” that is sometimes used in combination with Herceptin

med-her2-600px

Side effects:

Although Herceptin has been shown to have greatest benefit when used in combination with chemotherapy, it is not in itself a chemotherapy treatment. Chemotherapy treatments affect all rapidly dividing cells whether they are cancer cells or healthy cells.

Herceptin, however, targets only those abnormal cells with increased display of the HER2 receptor and it spares the healthy cells.

For this reason the side effect profile is substantially less.

Its main possible side effect is on the heart and the use of Herceptin in some patients may require baseline and periodic cardiac function tests. This side effect is usually reversible. In some cases hypersensitivity or allergic reactions can occur and for this reason it should be given in an appropriately equipped facility by staff who are trained to manage a possible reaction. Other less common and mild side effects may include fever, throat irritation and runny nose.

It is an intravenous therapy administered via a peripheral drip into a vein ideally every 3 weeks for one year.

However, it is unfortunately extremely expensive, not yet available in State hospitals and not covered by many Medical Aid schemes.

For those who can afford it, or those whose medical aids will cover it, Herceptin has significantly improved the prognosis and survival of patients with HER2 positive breast cancers to the extent that the outcomes are even better than some patients with HER2 negative breast cancers!

This blog was kindly supplied by Ronelle de Villiers at http://www.capebreastcare.org

 

Buddies for life!

bhf circleBuddies For Life is a bi-monthly lifestyle magazine, published by Word for Word Media in association with the Breast Health Foundation, for breast cancer patients, their families and friends. It was launched in June 2011, and 22 issues have been published to date with many more to come.

The glossy print and online magazine aims to educate, encourage and provide support. An array of medical professionals and experts write supportive and educational articles for the magazine on topics such as treatment, health and wellness, diet, fitness, sexuality, new advances and psychological advice that will assist those affected by cancer to understand the disease and treatment.

The content is essential reading written in a style that simplifies terminology. Super Survivor is featured on the cover of every issue and the breast cancer survivor’s story is told. On the Chemo Couch is another platform for survivors to share their unique story.

In keeping with the aims of the Breast Health Foundation, each issue contains a section dedicated to the early detection and awareness of breast cancer.

Oncology Buddies, supported by CANSA, is a new section within the magazine catering for other cancer awareness, early detection and various support groups.

Buddies For Life is available in print at hospitals, private clinics, oncology practises, Buddies for lifemammography units, radiology centres and support groups. Medipost courier the distribution of the print magazines to all the various distribution points.

A digital version is also available on www.buddiesforlife.co.za and yearly subscriptions are offered.

bu

 

The Breast Health Foundation is one of the partner organisations in the Advocates for Breast Cancer (ABC)