What is normal?

qLet’s normalise a few things right now:

  • There is no “right way” to make sense of what a cancer diagnosis means in anyone’s life
  • We can’t expect everyone to react in a similar way, or say the same things as anyone else – each person is unique and of course their response to their cancer treatment will be individual as well;
  • It’s very common for people to feel confused, disbelieving or angry when newly diagnosed, but this is not true for everyone;
  • Sometimes our bodies even respond to the stress and shock with physical responses – headaches, nausea, diarrhea, sighing, poor sleep patterns etc; and
  • Often people look forward to the end of treatment, but sometimes folks feel fearful, uncertain, or more emotional than they did during the treatment.

Blog by Clare Manicom, Oncology Social Worker

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Creamed root gratin

Another recipe for the tough times. This is pure comfort food for when you feel like nothing else.

gratin

500g potatoes, peeled and chopped
a generous cup of celeriac, peeled and chopped
1 small parsnip, peeled and diced quite small
1 small chopped onion
1 clarge carrot, peeled and very thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, and the same of black pepper
1 teaspoon low salt stock powder
Soya milk to cover

Bring to the boil and simmer until the vegetables are very soft. Drain and mash or blend to a smooth puree.

Pile into an oiled, overnproof dish, splash with a little olive oil and soy sauce and bake in a hot oven (200 deg C) until golden.

Serve hot, sprinkled with parsley or chives.

Yummy!

THANKS TO DR ROSY DANIEL, WHO HAS GENEROUSLY SHARED THE CANCER LIFELINE RECIPES WITH US. THIS RECIPE IS FOR THE TOUGH TIMES, FOR USE WHEN YOU ARE VERY ILL, DURING TREATMENT, WHILE THE APPETITE IS POOR AND THE WEIGHT LOW.

Buddies for life!

bhf circleBuddies For Life is a bi-monthly lifestyle magazine, published by Word for Word Media in association with the Breast Health Foundation, for breast cancer patients, their families and friends. It was launched in June 2011, and 22 issues have been published to date with many more to come.

The glossy print and online magazine aims to educate, encourage and provide support. An array of medical professionals and experts write supportive and educational articles for the magazine on topics such as treatment, health and wellness, diet, fitness, sexuality, new advances and psychological advice that will assist those affected by cancer to understand the disease and treatment.

The content is essential reading written in a style that simplifies terminology. Super Survivor is featured on the cover of every issue and the breast cancer survivor’s story is told. On the Chemo Couch is another platform for survivors to share their unique story.

In keeping with the aims of the Breast Health Foundation, each issue contains a section dedicated to the early detection and awareness of breast cancer.

Oncology Buddies, supported by CANSA, is a new section within the magazine catering for other cancer awareness, early detection and various support groups.

Buddies For Life is available in print at hospitals, private clinics, oncology practises, Buddies for lifemammography units, radiology centres and support groups. Medipost courier the distribution of the print magazines to all the various distribution points.

A digital version is also available on www.buddiesforlife.co.za and yearly subscriptions are offered.

bu

 

The Breast Health Foundation is one of the partner organisations in the Advocates for Breast Cancer (ABC)

Keeping cool in the tough times

Two-Coolers-RecipeIt is hard to imagine feeling hot and bothered in our chilly winter weather, but cancer treatment can play havoc with our normal body temperature.

And even if you are not feeling the heat, you can always do with a fruity vitamin boost!

Two Coolers
When you feel hot and bothered or sore try these to soothe and refresh.

Strawberry and Citrus Sorbet

Fresh juice of 2 big oranges
Fresh juice of 1 pink grapefruit
Fresh juice of 2 tangerines
Zest of 2 organic oranges, finely grated
10ozs (250g,2 cups) fresh strawberries or raspberries, cleaned
5 tablespoons maple syrup

Whizz together in a goblet blender or food processor. Pour into a shallow dish and freeze for 2-3 hours. Break into chunks and process again (using a sharp blade) until smooth and creamy. Return to the freezer for 30 minutes before serving. If you want to leave it longer in the freezer put it into little ice-lolly moulds at the final freeze and get them out as you feel the need.

For a change with added food value, try adding:

4ozs (100g, ½ cup) plain silken tofu
2 tablespoons more of maple syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla essence

Include frozen bananas at the final whizz stage before the second freeze.

Frozen Bananas

The simplest soother ever! Just peel ripe, firm and perfect bananas, wrap them individually in kitchen wrap/film and freeze overnight. Nibble on them whenever you fancy something cool and creamy. Don’t keep them in the freezer for too long, just do a few at a time.

If you can find sugar-free carob drops (try health food shops) melt them like chocolate in a ‘bain-marie’ (double saucepan) and dip your bananas in for an iron fortified, luxurious treat.

THANKS TO DR ROSY DANIEL, WHO HAS GENEROUSLY SHARED THE CANCER LIFELINE RECIPES WITH US. THIS RECIPE IS FOR THE TOUGH TIMES, FOR USE WHEN YOU ARE VERY ILL, DURING TREATMENT, WHILE THE APPETITE IS POOR AND THE WEIGHT LOW.

Keeping the balance

Over the next couple of weeks, we will be posting a series of recipies that will help you as you go through treatment. The Cancer Lifeline recipies are divided into three phases:

  • Tough Times, for use when you are very ill, during treatment, while the appetite is poor and the weight low.
  • Clean Machine, for detoxification of the body, post cancer treatment, or to kickstart a holistic health creation programme.
  • Eat Right, to set the right style of eating for the rest of your life to generate optimum health.

The recipies have been created by celebrity chef and nutrition consultant, Jane Sen, for the nourishment and healing of people with cancer. The recipies are part of the Cancer Lifeline Kit by Dr Rosy Daniel, which she has generously shared with us.

balance

Making an impact

The Breast Course for Nurses: who we are and what we have done over the last 12 months     

We have run several courses over the last 12 months:

Cape Town, South Africa – 15 nurses trained
Lilongwe, Malawi – 26 nurses trained
Windhoek, Namibia – 30 nurses trained
Ongwediva, Namibia – 30 nurses trained
Harare, Zimbabwe – 257 health care providers trained
Johannesburg, South Africa – 42 nurses trained

An account of each course can be found on the blog: http://www.jennyedge.co.za and Facebook page: www.facebook.com/breastcourse4nurses

blog 2The course is constantly evolving and I want to highlight some of the new changes we have made this year.

The major challenge we have addressed is allowing the course to run independently.

I have learnt a lot about teaching through the whole process.  The course was set up along the principles of the flipped class technique.

blog 2.1Unlike teaching at school, the participants on the courses are very varied and most are experts in their own areas.  We were constantly faced with the challenge of having large numbers of health care workers with vastly differing levels of knowledge about breast cancer and differing needs from the course.  In Zimbabwe, we were asked to extend the training to include doctors.  We met the challenge by dividing the 2 day course into 3 day long modules:
Module 1 was capped at 80 students and aimed at primary health care workers, breast cancer advocates and registered nurses.
Module 2 was capped at 50 participants and was aimed at registered nurses from the clinics, oncology sisters and doctors.
Module 3 was capped at 30 participants and was aimed at oncology sisters and doctors.  It allowed us to teach biopsy techniques.

blog 2.2We were also asked to have a “train the trainers” day. In many ways, the request ran against our aim to equip nurses to be self sufficient in their learning.  (The principle behind PEP is that health care workers should educate themselves with the material provided.)  Nevertheless, we blended the 2 approaches and Prof Woods and I ran a day in which we looked at different teaching modalities and tried to apply them to the course.  We defined “teaching” as the “sharing of understanding”
The result was that Module 1 of the Breast Course for Nurses was entirely taught by the nurses who attended the train the trainer’s day and studied the book (Breast Care).  I was immensely proud!

In Johannesburg, we took a different approach to deal with the challenge.  The course was run at Charlotte Maxeke Hospital by Dr Sarah Nietz and her team.  I wasn’t there at all.  I understand that 45 nurses completed the course.  The faculty were entirely local.

blog 2.3

Many thanks to everyone who has been involved with the Breast Course for Nurses.  If you wish to become involved, run a course or know more, please contact us.

Dr Jenny Edge, Founder and director of Breast Course for Nurses (PBO No.: 930050375)

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/breastcourse4nurses

Blog: www.jennyedge.co.za

Email: lieskewegelin@gmail.com

 

 

The Breast Course for Nurses: who we are and what we do

Regular readers of this blog will know that the Cancer Alliance is a collective initiative by South Africa’s main breast cancer organisations. We will be introducing each of our partners over the next few months. Today, meet Breast Course for Nurses. This blog was written by Dr Jenny Edge, Founder and director of Breast Course for Nurses.

     

It is an indisputable fact that women who are diagnosed with breast cancer at an earlier stage have a much better outcome than those diagnosed at a later stage.  Breast cancer screening programmes are well established in high income countries.

The modality of screening used is generally mammographic screening.

There has been a lot of debate about why women are diagnosed late in low income settings.  Do they present late because they are scared or cannot afford to access the health facility?  Do they present with symptoms that are not recognized as cancer by the health care worker (generally a nurse in a primary clinic)?  Do they get lost in the journey of diagnostic tests?

We don’t have the answer to these questions.  The Breast Course for Nurses aims to educate nurses working in primary clinics and equip them with the skills to recognise normal changes to the breast and differentiate them from changes associated with breast cancer.  We teach clinical breast examination with an aim to identifying breast cancers at an earlier stage.

Does clinical breast examination work as a means of breast screening?

Clinical breast examination, as a screening modality, has been studied with mixed results.   A recent study carried out in Sudan showed that clinical examination does pick up breast cancer at an earlier stage than in the control population.1    In Canada, where clinical breast examination was compared to mammographic examination, the mortality from breast cancer, 20 years later, was similar in both groups although more cancers were diagnosed in the mammographically screened population2.

The Breast Course for Nurses is a combination of a self-learning program (PEP educations series) and a residential program that contextualizes the theory in the book, encourages networking amongst the participants and stimulates debate as to how to improve access to care.  The courses are taught by local faculty and no course is the same.

Does our method of transferring understanding work?  We will be doing various projects to look at the impact of running our course.

In the next blog, we will give details of the courses we have run over the last 12 months.

References

  1. Abuidris DO1, Elsheikh A, Ali M, Musa H, Elgaili E, Ahmed AO, Sulieman I, Mohammed SI. Breast-cancer screening with trained volunteers in a rural area of Sudan: a pilot study. Lancet Oncol. 2013 Apr;14(4):363-70. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(12)70583-1. Epub 2013 Jan 31.
  1. Anthony B Miller, Claus Wall, Cornelia J Baines, Ping Sun, Teresa To, Steven A Narod.. Twenty five year follow-up for breast cancer incidence and mortality of the Canadian National Breast. Screening Study: randomised screening trial. BMJ: g366 doi:10.1136/bmj g 366

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/breastcourse4nurses

Blog: www.jennyedge.co.za

Email: lieskewegelin@gmail.com

ABC - Advocates for Breast Cancer - Breast Course 4 Nurses