Keeping cool in the tough times

Two-Coolers-RecipeIt is hard to imagine feeling hot and bothered in our chilly winter weather, but cancer treatment can play havoc with our normal body temperature.

And even if you are not feeling the heat, you can always do with a fruity vitamin boost!

Two Coolers
When you feel hot and bothered or sore try these to soothe and refresh.

Strawberry and Citrus Sorbet

Fresh juice of 2 big oranges
Fresh juice of 1 pink grapefruit
Fresh juice of 2 tangerines
Zest of 2 organic oranges, finely grated
10ozs (250g,2 cups) fresh strawberries or raspberries, cleaned
5 tablespoons maple syrup

Whizz together in a goblet blender or food processor. Pour into a shallow dish and freeze for 2-3 hours. Break into chunks and process again (using a sharp blade) until smooth and creamy. Return to the freezer for 30 minutes before serving. If you want to leave it longer in the freezer put it into little ice-lolly moulds at the final freeze and get them out as you feel the need.

For a change with added food value, try adding:

4ozs (100g, ½ cup) plain silken tofu
2 tablespoons more of maple syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla essence

Include frozen bananas at the final whizz stage before the second freeze.

Frozen Bananas

The simplest soother ever! Just peel ripe, firm and perfect bananas, wrap them individually in kitchen wrap/film and freeze overnight. Nibble on them whenever you fancy something cool and creamy. Don’t keep them in the freezer for too long, just do a few at a time.

If you can find sugar-free carob drops (try health food shops) melt them like chocolate in a ‘bain-marie’ (double saucepan) and dip your bananas in for an iron fortified, luxurious treat.

THANKS TO DR ROSY DANIEL, WHO HAS GENEROUSLY SHARED THE CANCER LIFELINE RECIPES WITH US. THIS RECIPE IS FOR THE TOUGH TIMES, FOR USE WHEN YOU ARE VERY ILL, DURING TREATMENT, WHILE THE APPETITE IS POOR AND THE WEIGHT LOW.

The DITTO project

ditto

The Ditto project is an initiative run by Reach for Recovery to provide indigent women access to a silicone prosthesis which helps to restore her self-image and confidence after the traumatic breast cancer diagnosis and surgery.

Surgery after a breast cancer diagnosis may involve part or all of a breast being removed (mastectomy). Having a mastectomy leads to a tier of decision making regarding whether to have surgical reconstruction, wear an external breast prosthesis, or not wear anything at all to replace the amputated breast.  External breast prosthesis may be the best option a woman has, especially if she cannot afford to undergo reconstructive surgery.  However, not all patients can afford the cost of a permanent prosthesis.

Reach for Recovery believes that all women who have had breast cancer surgery should have access to appropriate breast prostheses, regardless of whether they can pay for it or not. The reality is that many breast cancer patients in South Africa cannot even afford a bra, let alone a breast prosthesis. Reach for Recovery wants to help these women who come from low income groups to feel confident again after the traumatic diagnoses and surgery.  We believe that a breast prosthesis is an important step in her recovery, especially to those women from communities where a there is still a stigma attached to a cancer diagnoses.  A more natural appearance with a breast prosthesis, together with the emotional support that she can continue to receive from Reach for Recovery volunteers through support groups, will help her to return to her place of employment and continue to provide for her family.

Any breast cancer patient who can present a current Provincial Hospital Card qualifies for access to subsidised silicone prosthesis.  The patient is asked to make a donation of R80 towards the project (R160 in case of a bilateral).   However, no patient has ever been turned away because she could not afford to make a donation.  The prosthesis may be replaced after three years.

Unfortunately Reach for Recovery cannot provide the paying customer with an invoice to claim back from their medical aid as we do not have a Medical Practice Number.  However, we do offer as much support as possible in terms of general information on local and international manufacturers, suppliers etc.

The Ditto Project started in 2011.  Since then, a total of 3235 silicone prostheses costing more than R2 million were given to women who could not afford one.  Many women donated a small amount (R80) as a token of their gratitude, but we also supported women who could not afford any donation at all.

Apart from state patients, a growing number of women only have a Hospital Plan which does not cover breast prostheses. Pensioners are particularly hard hit.

We have also seen a steady increase in the number of women needing silicone prostheses since 2011:  from 475 in 2011 to 930 in 2015.  There is without doubt a growing need for this service.   Unfortunately a silicone prosthesis is guaranteed to last for only two years; therefore we are also experiencing women returning to Reach for Recovery to have their prostheses replaced.

The need for silicone prostheses for newly referred breast cancer patients plus the need for replacements impacts heavily on the funds that we use to subsidise these products. A needs analysis has shown that we would subsidise at least 1000 women with a new silicon breast prosthesis in the new financial year.  This includes women who would need a replacement.

We are extremely thankful to our donors who help us to ensure the sustainability of this project!

Reach to Recovery is one of the breast cancer organisations that is a part of ABC.

 

Reach for Recovery Logo (2)

Rice porridge for the tough times

rice pudCreamy rice porridge

Delicious, nutritious and comforting. Traditional oat porridge is good too but try this one for extra food value. It is well worth the investment in a small ‘slow cooker ‘as it will be perfect at breakfast time. It keeps for 2 or 3 days in the fridge. Re-heat with a little extra soya milk or enjoy it cold with maple syrup, a chopped banana and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

2ozs (50g, generous ½ cup) brown rice

2 pints (1 litre) soya milk

Handful of dried fruits (optional)

Cook overnight in an electric slow cooker. If you do not have an electric slow cooker then just bring to the boil in a nice heavy casserole, lower heat to barely simmering, cover and cook for 2 ½ hours. You may need to add a little more soya milk. You can also pop it into a low oven for about 3 hours.

Serve with a little maple or date syrup or compote of fruit.

You can add any dried fruit you like – it is especially scrumptious with apricots or dates.

Thanks to Dr Rosy Daniel, who has generously shared The Cancer Lifeline recipes with us. This recipe is for the Tough Times, for use when you are very ill, during treatment, while the appetite is poor and the weight low.

Staying fit, feeling good

Do daily exercises

After a mastectomy or if you have surgery to your armpit, your surgeon and physiotherapist will ask you to do regular exercises to help you recover. Your arm may feel stiff on the side where your breast was removed. Simple arm exercises can help to

  • give you back your full range of movement (also important for radiotherapy treatment)
  • relieve pain and stiffness
  • reduce swelling

After surgery, do the exercises until you have full movement back in your arm and shoulder. Ideally, you should do these twice a day.

To start with, the exercises are quite gentle. The aim is to get your arm and shoulder moving as it was before the surgery. You can begin each session by circling your shoulders, to get the muscles moving. Other early exercises are brushing or combing your hair, putting your arms behind your back and touching your shoulder with your hand. As you get stronger and more confident, you can do more of the exercises and gradually increase the range of movements.

Have a look at this excellent video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vo1S-K2MetM

Talk to your surgeon or physiotherapist if you have ongoing problems with arm or shoulder pain, stiffness or swelling.

If you have had breast reconstruction surgery the exercises you do are different and depend upon the type of reconstruction you have had. Check with your surgeon and physiotherapist!

Stay physically active

Tiredness and weakness is finally being recognised as one of the most common side effects from cancer treatment. It’s called: Cancer Related Fatigue. The reasons for it are multifold: the cancer itself drains your energy, the treatment is intense and often toxic, but also the lack of normal physical activity during treatment leads to loss of fitness.

It is encouraging that taking regular exercise can help to combat it. More and more research is showing that exercise during and after treatment is safe and helps recovery after cancer. Regular exercise can reduce stress and give you more energy.

 

But how much, and how often, and what exercise is suitable for me?

To be beneficial, exercise should be 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, of moderate intense activity such as walking, cycling or dancing. You should get warm and increase your heartbeat without getting out of breath. This level of activity is helpful for people even during treatment.

30mins

Everyone is different and exercise needs to be tailored to individual people, taking into account your diagnosis and treatment (weightlifting shortly after breast surgery), other problems (diabetes, cancer in the bones) and not least: what you love to do and feel is possible in terms of time, travel and costs! A physiotherapist or biokineticist can help you on your way.

Have a look at the pyramid and see what daily exercise you can easily incorporate in your life.

pyramid

Exercise can also be helpful in a number of cancer related side effects:

  • neuropathy (pins and needles, problems with balance): aerobic exercise helps with the recovery of the damaged nerve ends by increasing blood flow.
  • osteoporosis (thinning of the bones): weight bearing exercise means running or rowing or anything where your bones are doing some work. This type of exercise may protect you against osteoporosis (thinning of the bones). Osteoporosis is a concern for many post menopausal women who have had hormone dependent cancers and so cannot take hormone replacement therapy.
  • depression/anxiety: many women with breast cancer battle with depression; regular exercise, possibly in a group, leads to less anxiety and need for medication.

Keep your pace

A very important advise to women fighting cancer is to listen to your body. But how can you do that, juggling a family, doctor’s appointments, medication, work obligations and loosing a breast at the same time?

This great advice was shared with us by the fabulous physiotherapist Liesbeth Raymakers

 

Staying active and healthy

We’re on a mission to help you to live an active and healthy life during cancer treatment, to empower you actively to cope with the cancer journey.

The recipies we are sharing are part of that, and here is a great list of things to do (and not to do) to make your journey easier.

Do’s:

    • talk with your loved ones about your feelings of loss, speak to other breast cancer survivors, find support online
    • get adequate pain medication
    • contact your doctor or nurse when you develop problems
    • massage the scars daily, dry or gently with a non-irritating skin oil. There’s a good video here to help you.

Don’ts:

  • push yourself: be mild and accept the pace your body is healing at
  • lift or carry anything heavy for the first few weeks after surgery. This includes vacuuming, shopping and lifting a full kettle or a child.

Watch out for:

Wound infection

If your operation site becomes red, inflamed, or painful, or there is a fluid (discharge) leaking from your wound site, you may have an infection. Contact your surgeon or breast care nurse immediately. If you have an infection, you will need antibiotics to clear it up.

Fluid collecting around the operation site (seroma)

Sometimes fluid continues to collect near the wound after your wound drains have been taken out. This is called a seroma. It causes swelling and pain and can increase the risk of infection. The fluid usually goes away on its own. Sometimes a nurse needs to drain the fluid off with a needle and syringe. They may need to do this a few times.

For some women, the fluid takes a long time to go. It can take up to a few months after your surgery.

Nerve pain

You may have numbness or tingling in your upper arm, particularly if you had your lymph nodes removed. This is normal and happens because some nerves are cut during the operation and need to repair themselves. It can take a few weeks or months to go. If it continues, get in touch with your breast care nurse or surgeon.

Swelling of your arm or hand

You may have some swelling in your arm or hand after your operation. This is normal. But it should start to go away as you do the exercises (see below) to get back the movement of your shoulder and arm.

If you continue to get a lot of swelling, heaviness, pain or tenderness in your arm or hand, let your breast care nurse or surgeon know as soon as possible. After surgery or radiotherapy to the armpit, there is a risk of developing permanent swelling called lymphoedema. Once you have lymphoedema it can’t be cured but early treatment can effectively control it. Look at the information about lymphoedema page for ways of preventing lymphoedema.

Scar tissue in the armpit (cording)

Some women develop scar tissue in the armpit (axilla), which forms a tight band. This can happen 6 to 8 weeks after the operation. The scar tissue is called cording or banding and can feel something like a guitar string. Cording is harmless but can be uncomfortable. It can get better after some time if you massage the area of the scar tissue. Your specialist nurse or a physiotherapist can teach you how to do this.

This great advice was shared with us by the fabulous physiotherapist Liesbeth Raymakers

 

 

Keeping the balance

Over the next couple of weeks, we will be posting a series of recipies that will help you as you go through treatment. The Cancer Lifeline recipies are divided into three phases:

  • Tough Times, for use when you are very ill, during treatment, while the appetite is poor and the weight low.
  • Clean Machine, for detoxification of the body, post cancer treatment, or to kickstart a holistic health creation programme.
  • Eat Right, to set the right style of eating for the rest of your life to generate optimum health.

The recipies have been created by celebrity chef and nutrition consultant, Jane Sen, for the nourishment and healing of people with cancer. The recipies are part of the Cancer Lifeline Kit by Dr Rosy Daniel, which she has generously shared with us.

balance

Those dreaded side effects!

sideeffects

The chemotherapy drugs cannot distinguish between cancer cells and normal cells of the body and will attack other rapidly growing cells such as hair,skin, nails, lining of the digestive system and bone marrow (blood cell lines).

Therefore there are various side effects associated with the therapy and  because each drug acts in a slightly different way, the side effects will also differ between different drugs.

Thankfully, like all drugs (including Panado and Aspirin), not every side effect is experienced by every person, and some side effects are experienced to lesser degrees in some people.

Many side effects may be unpleasant, but are not harmful. Some side effects may get worse and some may get better with each cycle of treatment. Others may develop during the course of the treatment.

Some side effects need to be treated and some can be managed by anticipating them and controlling them in advance which lessens their effect.

Some side effects are more serious and it is important to contact your doctor if you are worried.

The good news is that cancer cells divide more rapidly than normal cells and are therefore more likely to be killed by chemotherapy.

More good news is that normal cells are also more able to recover than cancer cells and therefore most side effects are not permanent and will reverse once the treatment is finished.

Blood cell counts are done each time a new cycle of chemotherapy is started. This is usually done the day before the next treatment or very early on the same morning of the treatment. Sometimes a blood test will be done mid-cycle depending on the patient or the combination of drugs used.

The most common side effects and some of the agents that cause them:

Nausea/Vomiting (FEC, AC> CMF, Xeloda)

Drugs that help prevent against nausea are given before the combinations that cause this. Medication is also given to take home for a few days after treatment too. Different drugs work for different people and it may be necessary to try more than one antiemetic before you get relief.  It is important not to give up – if the prescribed antiemetic is not effective, work with your doctor and nurse to find the one that works best for you.

Diarrhoea/ Constipation (all, but especially Xeloda, Vinorelbine)

The irritation of the lining of the bowel may lead to diarrhoea. This can often be managed with dietry changes but may require medication. Drinking lots of fluids is important to help replace losses.

Chemotherapy may cause some people to become constipated.  Others may become constipated because they are less active than before, because of diet changes, or from pain medication they may be taking.

Mouth sores and ulcers (all)

The cells lining the mouth may be affected and the mouth may be sensitive or develop small ulcers. Sometimes changes or loss of taste can occur which recovers once treatment is completed.

Lower blood cell counts (FEC,AC, CMF, Gemcitabine,Vinorelbine,)

This occurs because the chemotherapy drugs affect the bone marrow. The bone marrow makes white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. The levels of these blood cell counts are checked regularly during treatment.

Low white cell counts (FEC, AC, CMF)– white blood cells help fight infection. If you have a severe infection and your white cell count is very low, it could be life threatening and may require hospitilisation. It is important to contact your treating doctor if your temperature goes above 38degC.

Low red cell counts (FEC,AC, CMF,Taxol, Gemcitabine)– red blood cells carry oxygen to the cells. If the count goes down you may become anaemic which will result in you feeling tired and breathless. If severe, you may need a blood transfusion.

Low platelets (Gemcitabine)– platelets help blood to clot. If the count goes down you may bruise easily.

Tiredness/Fatigue (all)

Fatigue is a common side-effect of chemotherapy and can range from mild lethargy to feeling completely wiped out.  It is not always due to a low red cell count (anaemia). It can be a deep tiredness that does not get better from sleep and tends to be worse at the beginning and end of a treatment cycle but may persist for 6 months to a year after treatment.

Hair loss (FEC,AC) Hair thinning (CMF,Taxol, Vinorelbine)

Some chemotherapy combinations (such as AC, FEC, CAF) make all hair fall out both on the head and the rest of the body.

Other combinations cause some hair to fall out so the hair thins out.

This can be upsetting but it is temporary- the hair will begin to grow back a few weeks after treatment has stopped. It may grow back different in colour or texture though.

Skin and nail changes (Taxol, Xeloda, Vinorelbine)

Skin may become dry and sensitive to sunlight and some drugs even cause rashes. Nails may also become brittle or discoloured.

Hand-foot  Syndrome (Xeloda)

The earliest symptoms of Hand-foot Syndrome is a painful sensitivity of the hands and feet. It may progress from sensitivity to redness and swelling on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.  The redness looks like sunburn and it may blister and in severe cases form sores.  The affected skin can also become dry and peel.  It is important to advise your doctor or nurse about any Hand-foot Syndrome symptoms, even if they are mild, as treating early can help prevent severe cases.

Eye problems (all)

Sore eyes, “gritty” eyes, watery eyes, infection in eyes(conjunctivitis), and blurred vision may occur in some people to varying degrees during their treatment.

Phlebitis (FEC, AC, CMF, Vinorelbine,)

Damage to the lining of the veins used in some chemotherapies can result in discomfort or burning sensation in the veins. This may last for some weeks. If venous access is difficult a port (a cannula inserted under a general anaesthetic)into a large vein in the chest) may be advised. If the vein is burning or painful during chemotherapy, please alert the chemotherapy sister.

Peripheral neuropathy (Taxol, Vinorelbine)

This is experienced as a numbness or tingling sensation in fingers or toes. In more severe cases it may be painful. It is most commonly seen in diabetics and in those who have had multiple courses as it tends to be cumulative. It may persist for a few months after completing treatment.

Allergic reactions (Taxol)

If this occurs, it usually happens with the first dose. If it occurs it will happen in the chemo room and not later at home. It is usually prevented by and easily treated with antihistamines and steroids.

Liver changes (Gemcitabine, Vinorelbine,Xeloda)

In many cases this is only noticed on the blood tests and goes unnoticed by the patient. It will go back to normal after treatment. In the cases of breast cancer that has already spread to the liver, the liver function may be affected by the cancer itself and may actually improve on chemotherapy.

Menstrual irregularity and infertility (all)

When women receive chemotherapy it can damage the ovaries and reduce the amount of hormones they produce, resulting in short-or long-term infertility (inability to fall pregnant).  The effects of ‘chemo’ on your hormones may result in:

♦          Menstrual periods becoming irregular or stopping completely

♦          Menopause-like symptoms, e.g. hot flushes and itching burning, or dryness

of vaginal tissues

♦          Vaginal infections are more likely

Menstrual function can start again up to 2 years after chemotherapy. The onset of menopause may also be brought earlier and fertility may be impaired. If a woman may want a baby after chemotherapy, it is a good idea to discuss this with the doctor before starting chemotherapy.

Remember that, chemotherapy is not a safe method of contraception and a safe contraceptive is very important during chemotherapy as the drugs would be extremely harmful to the foetus.

Cardiac failure (FEC, AC, CAF, Xeloda)

In very rare instances some chemotherapy can lead to heart failure. If your doctor thinks you are at risk a cardiac function test will be done before starting chemotherapy.

There are many other possible side effects of chemotherapy, many of which are extremely rare or mild and therefore not covered here but can be discussed individually with your doctor if you have concerns.

Frequently asked Questions:

“So just how bad am I going to feel?”

This is impossible to predict.  Everybody is different.  Many people can continue working during chemo, but may find they need to take a day or 2 off after chemo before going back to work.  Remember your experience will be different from the lady sitting next to you in the chemo room, so don’t panic if you find you are having a harder time than she (or an easier time!).  Tell your doctor.  Often something can be done to make the next time better.  Some things  you may have to grin and bear.

“What about other medicines, drugs and supplements during chemotherapy?”

It is important to discuss this with your specialist any other drugs your are taking or additional drugs you would like to take.  This includes vitamins or dietary supplements, vaccines or immunizations, immune boosters and herbal medicines.  They may interfere with the effectivity of your chemotherapy treatment.  Whatever boosts you may boost your cancer cells too!!

Blog written by Ronelle Lovric http://www.capebreastcare.org