A 2400 journey of hope

Cancervive travelled 2400km across the Western Cape and the Eastern Cape provinces of South Africa, from 08 – 18 September through the varying landscapes of lush vegetation, unkempt wildness and stretches of desolation, to raise awareness about cancer.

From the farming communities of Caledon, Riviersonderend, Swellendam and Riversdale through the glorious Garden Route all the way to rural schools and factories, the message “Early detection saves lives” was shared by survivors who have walked the cancer journey and bear testament to this statement, with their own bruised bodies and yet determined spirits. The power of their personal words of survival brought hope to those who often feel isolated in communities where the stigma of living with this dread disease is prevalent. The opportunity to interact with the survivors made room for many to ask gnawing questions that they otherwise would not have had the courage to ask openly or known who to ask.

The vibrant youth at schools were receptive to our entertaining performers but also paid keen attention to the delivery of relatable messages from survivors diagnosed with cancer as young as the ages of 7 and 13 as well as in their 20’s, as they demonstrated the importance of the message of survival due to early detection, which may at times mean living without some important parts of one’s body. From the packed school halls and where none were big enough to accommodate the crowds, the school fields, there was no space too inadequate for us not to reach out.

Young and old cancer survivors and supporters once again left a memorable trail of a pink, purple and blue rainbow of hope in rural and urban communities. Through testimonials from survivors as well as soothing sessions of song and dance, this diverse group of dedicated foot soldiers delicately presented messages of early detection, survival and celebrating life while living with cancer.

http://www.plwc.org.za/

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I’M(POSSIBLE)

“Nusha Loubser” ~ Photographed by Tracey Derrick

50 years old,  | Hairdresser  |  Vredenberg

Diagnosed: 1st November 2005 – mastectomy, chemotherapy and tamoxifen for five years.

“The worst was losing my hair and being so tired, yet we believe all things are possible like the Word of God reminds us in the Bible.” 

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Row, Row, Row Your Boat!

Cassiem Rayghanah” ~ by Tracey Derrick
50 years old | Liaison specialist | Heideveld

 

Diagnosed: 5th August 2005 – lumpectomy, chemotherapy, radiation & tamoxifen for five years.
Second diagnosis: 15th June 2009 – cancer lesion in breastbone. Radiation, chemotherapy and femara estrogen suppression. Liaison specialist. Heideveld.
Member of amaBele Belles breast cancer dragon boat rowing team!

“We like to think of ourselves as a floating support group because we’re fighting a communal battle with dignity and commitment.” 2009

 

Tracey Derrick: portraits of breast cancer survivors - Cassiem Rayghana

From Tracey’s 1 in 9 seminar paper, continued from yesterday’s post:

“I agree with his [Richard Avedon] sentiments but it is also about directing the photographic situation and the challenge is still to try and capture a moment, the communication between myself – the photographer – and the subject. As Kuhn says, “The face stands in for the person’s whole being, the subject’s essential humanity is seen as inhabiting the face, the ‘window of the soul’.” (1994:37).

Photographs function in constructing and encouraging particular ways of viewing and telling about the world. The photographs of breast cancer survivors – Alicia and Suzanne (above), Cassiem and Siona (not shown) – are woman that I have met during my breast cancer process. My projects have always developed over a period of time, influenced by the people that I have met along the way and interacted with. These photographs reflect in part my relationship with them.”


DISCOVER MORE ABOUT THE AMABELE BELLES!

Racing for Wellness ~ Cape Times

Friend them on Facebook here!

Metamorphosis…

Tracey Derrick - photographer - breast cancer survivor - mastectomy - tattoo

 


CHALLENGE: Post your breast cancer tattoo on our Facebook page here (and tell us all about what inspired it!) — then tag us using either our Facebook name: @AdvocatesForBreastCancer or by using the hashtag: #ABCbreastcancertattoo


 

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CHOOSE YOUnique BeYOUty!

Tracey Derrick - plaster cast of her chest post-mastectomy - self portraiture: photography

Today’s photograph from Tracey Derrick‘s body of work, 1 in 9, is a photograph of the plaster cast she made of her chest, post-mastectomy. Through the tender replication of her chest, she somehow manages to both powerfully AND gently obliterate the media’s ‘requirement’ for women to ‘build themselves back together’ into a state of ‘normal femininity’ —- and instead presents us with a portrait of herself simply as she is: pure, unencumbered, real and unutterably and beautifully herself: unique!

Whether we choose reconstruction, to wear breast prostheses or go breast-free, the power of choice lies in our hands: it is our choice, and our choice alone.


If you would like to share your story about your post-mastectomy body
and your new, YOUnique normal,
please pop us an inboxed message on Facebook!

HE{ART}FELT TAKEAWAYS

RESOURCES & IDEAS:

ART THERAPY BLOG: Activites & Ideas

EXPRESSIVE ART WORKSHOPS by Shelley Klammer

  • We love the idea of art journalling as creative ‘self therapy‘ (click here to read more!) but the website is full of other wonderful  ideas – and we recommend signing up for her very helpful and inspiring newsletters too!

 

Breasts: Object, Device, Possession?

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“After breast cancer treatment this identity of ‘desirable object’ becomes confused because the ‘traditional’ nude, as an idealized object of male desire, clearly precludes any possibility of illness or ‘imperfection’ and denies the ‘unacceptable’ hidden truths within, for example, the scars, a single breast, lumpy breasts, false breasts; changes that women live with after treatment. Through the media, the ideal woman is ‘put together’ and defined by appearance.

Artist Jo Spence was especially concerned with the breast as an object of desire, as a device for nourishing babies, and finally in her case of breast cancer, as a possession to be placed in the hands of the medical institution. This is exemplified by her photo of her breast, marked with a pen “Property of Jo Spence?” where she appears to question her rights over her own body, using the breast as a metaphor for women’s struggle to become active subjects. Following her *lumpectomy, she documented the appearance of her scarred breast, thereby challenging traditional representations of that subject. In one image she documents the struggle between her everyday appearance (revealing her scars), and the glamorous representation of women – signified by the Hollywood-style sunglasses and the seductive pose and drape of her blouse off her shoulder. (1986:157)

*Lumpectomy is surgery in which only the tumor and some surrounding tissue is removed. It is a form of “breast-preservation” and technically is a partial mastectomy. Jo Spence had a mastectomy later on in her life when her breast cancer returned.” ~ Tracey Derrick


TAKEWAYS RE: SCARS & SCAR MANAGEMENT

 

Red Devil!

Tracey Derrick - photographer - breast cancer self portraiture: chemo red devil

“My treatment on chemotherapy drugs was called CAF, a common cocktail for breast cancer. The regime combines cyclosphosphamide, doxorubican (andriamycin) and fluorouracil. Adriamycin is one of the most toxic chemotherapy agents available, notorious for its drastic side effects. It is a fluorescent red and when one sees the fluid flowing into one’s veins, nausea begins and a feeling of helplessness takes over – the body produces a violent reaction and fights it.

Nausea becomes a way of life, also vomiting and extreme fatigue.” ~ Tracey Derrick

 READ MORE ABOUT THE WHAT, WHY & SIDE-EFFECTS OF CAF HERE



TAKEAWAY: Listen in to ABC’s Project Manager, Salome Meyer, chat with Kfm about why she’s determined to make her fight against breast cancer count!!
Click here to tune in!

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